Don’t Waste the Crust

I’ve never been one of those mothers who carefully pared the crust off the PBJ’s I served my children for lunch.

For well over 20 years now, I’ve been coaxing my kids to eat the crusts of their sandwiches using the following rationale:

  1. It’s wasteful to leave them.

    -and-

  2. That’s where most of the vitamins are.

And for well over 20 years, my children have accepted my mother-wisdom at face value and at least feigned an attempt to cooperate with this imperative.

But not too long ago, a couple of my (young adult) children decided to question the validity of this claim.

The crust is where the vitamins are? they repeated skeptically. “Seriously, Mom, that may be true of apple skins, but bread is bread. The entire loaf comes from a single batch of dough. The nutritional value is no different in the crust than it is in the middle.”

They’re smart kids. They’re also very articulate.

If you’d been sitting at our table that day, you might even have been inclined to agree with them….

But if you did, you would’ve been wrong, as they were. Fortunately, Siri was on my side for the ensuing debate.

I knew I’d read some relevant statistics on bread crust before, so I whipped out my trusty iPhone and within seconds had located this article which summarily proved my point: Cancer-fighting anti-oxidants are eight times more plentiful in the crust than in any other part of the bread.

Don't Waste the Crusts - lovinglifeathome.comSo what if bread crust is tough and chewy or hard to swallow? It’s good for you. It’s rich in dietary fiber and in nutrients that help your body grow healthy and strong.

That’s the reason I keep serving it to my children, and it’s the reason they (mostly) keep eating it.

Unfortunately, we sometimes approach life the way kids approach sandwiches. We prefer the soft and cushy parts. If we could leave those tough parts untouched on our plate — or if we could talk our Heavenly Father into trimming off anything that seems difficult to swallow — we’d do it.

I’m as guilty of this mindset as anyone. I’ve always prayed that God would teach me the lessons I need to learn in the easiest, most gentle way possible.

I’ve secretly hoped that if I stay attuned to His still small voice, God won’t have to shout through the megaphone of pain to get my attention.

"Pain insists upon being attended to. God whispers to us in our pleasures, speaks in our consciences, but shouts in our pains. It is his megaphone to rouse a deaf world." - C.S. Lewis

But guess what? The tough trials, the hard challenges, the parts of life that make us lose our appetite — often those are the very things God uses to mature us, to strengthen our faith, and to nourish our relationship with Him.

And trials come no matter how intently we listen for His voice or read our Bibles or follow His promptings. We can avoid suffering unnecessarily by walking close with Him, but we can’t avoid suffering altogether.

Jesus told his followers, “In the world you will have trouble” (John 16:33) – it’s not a question of if, but when, and how will we react when it comes?

Scripture tells us plainly how God expects us to respond. We are to:

  • “Pray without ceasing; in everything give thanks; for this is God’s will for you in Christ Jesus.” (1 Thessalonians 5:17-18)

    -and-

  • Consider it all joy, my brethren, when you encounter various trials, knowing that the testing of your faith produces endurance. And let endurance have its perfect result, so that you may be perfect and complete, lacking in nothing.” (James 1:2-4)

Perfect. Complete. Lacking in nothing.

That’s God’s goal for us.

So next time you find yourself in a tough season of life, don’t let it go to waste. Trust that your Heavenly Father has a purpose in putting that difficulty on your plate and accept it with gratitude, knowing there are things you can get out of the hard parts of life that cannot be found in any other way.

Just dip it in the pure milk of the Word to make it easier to swallow. (1 Peter 2:2)

"Consider it joy..."

Making Big Investments in Little Things

President Obama created quite a stir last week with his comments regarding Moms who leave the workplace to stay home and raise children: “That’s not a choice we want Americans to make,” he said resolutely.

Recipe for Success: Making Big Investments in Little Things

His solution to the pesky problem of SAHMs? Taking more and more children out of their homes at younger and younger ages and placing them in tax payer funded preschool, so their moms can get back to climbing the corporate ladder ASAP.

The President pushes this agenda — and pretends it will be best for all parties involved — despite the fact research has shown that the more time kids spend in non-maternal care during their first 4.5 years, the more behavioral problems they develop.

This marginalizing of mothers’ influence reminds me of a friend I had in graduate school who was totally grossed out by the idea of breastfeeding. “Why would you choose to nurse,” she once asked me in all seriousness, “when formula is so readily available?” (She also considered C-sections preferable to vaginal birth).

Infant formulas have made great progress over the past few decades in approximating the nutritional make-up of “nature’s perfect food.” And I’m glad they are available — especially since one of my own children had difficulty latching on and might’ve died without formula supplementation.

But even the formula manufacturers themselves concede that mother’s milk is superior.

I tried to enumerate the benefits of breastfeeding to my squeamish friend, but she remained unpersuaded.

This girl was no dummy. She went on to earn her PhD in Mathematics. Babies and breastfeeding just weren’t a part of her plan for that season of her life, but rather than owning up to that fact, she tried to pretend that my babies would be better off if I’d adopt her choices.

Of course, I didn’t buy her pitch, either.

Instead, I dropped out of graduate school three classes shy of having my Master’s in Math. My first baby was born just a couple of weeks after my final final, and it was more important to me to stay home with him and the others that would soon follow than to earn another diploma to gather dust in my closet.

I know some mothers will choose or need to work outside their home while their children are still young. I get that. And I understand why they’d want high-quality childcare to facilitate this.

That much is obvious.

But let’s not pretend that a publicly-funded institution is a better place for preschool-aged children than a loving home, or that paid workers can do a superior job of nurturing and teaching and loving on little ones than their own mother.

And let’s not assume, Mr. President, that the workforce is best place for a woman at any stage of her life, but especially not when she has young children who need her attention.

Those little ones won’t stay little for long, and the investment a mother makes during their formative years will pay much bigger dividends in the long run than any 401(K) plan an employer could offer.


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My Favorite Marriage and Family Blogs

Want to nourish your marriage? You'll find a healthy dose of encouragement here: My Favorite Marriage & Family Blogs | lovinglifeathome.comIf there’s anything I’ve learned in 27+ years of marriage, it’s that “happily ever after” takes work.

Yes, it’s attainable, but not without liberal helpings of love and focus and commitment and intentionality and grace and forgiveness and discipline.

Marriage is wonderful. I love sharing life with my best friend.

But we are both human, and there is always room for improvement.

The secret for me has been to focus on the areas I need to improve rather than on what I think he needs to change.

One way I invest in my marriage is by reading good books and blogs on the topic of marriage and family.

I love the encouragement I receive from these candid, Christian writers.

I like the fact that reading their stories gives me the opportunity to learn from somebody else’s mistakes rather than repeating them myself.

There are lots of great books and blogs out there to choose from, but here is a list of my personal favorites: Click on each image to visit the blog and learn more about it.

Ashleigh Slater  Better Mom  Club 31 Women  Happy Wives Club  For the Family  Matt Jacobson  Revive Our Hearts  Time Warp Wife  To Love, Honor, and Vacuum  5 Love Languages

Incidentally, all but two of these authors/bloggers have books in the Ultimate Christian Living Bundle (only on sale through November 10, 2014). Among all the other great resources, you’ll find these treasures:

As well as a copy of my own book, which is also included…

Are there any books or blogs on marriage and motherhood you find yourself gravitating toward? Tell me about them in the comment section below so I can check them out, too!


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A Battle Plan for Marriage

We're at War (and you are, too)WE’RE AT WAR…. That’s what headlines all across the United States boldly proclaimed on the morning of January 17, 1991.

The Masthead was so large, it grabbed my attention the minute I opened the curtains of our little studio apartment.

Wanting to capture this historic moment on film, I bundled my two young children up warm and ushered them across the parking lot to take their picture front of the newsstand.

Rather than the somber faces one might expect from the offspring of an Army Reservist, my little ones broke out grinning from ear to ear as soon as they spotted Mom’s camera, totally oblivious to the tumult that threatened to rock their world.

Doesn’t that typify what happens in other areas of our lives, as well?

When I look back at photographs taken on our wedding day, I can’t help but notice my husband and I were wearing those same naive smiles.

Like most couples, we had no idea that as we walked arm-in-arm down the aisle and out of the church at the close of the ceremony, we were marching into battle. We were oblivious to the fact that there was a war raging on the horizon and that, even as we smiled for the camera, our marriage was under attack.

Marriages are under attack. Here's the battle plan we're using to protect ours.Unfortunately, when the attack is particularly sudden or stealth, it is sometimes difficult to even identify the enemy.

Some couples act as if they’re at war with one another. They mistakenly believe they have married the enemy, but they are dead wrong.

Know this:If you are married, you have an enemy — an enemy that will do everything in his power to destroy your marriage — but that enemy is not your spouse.

Ephesians 6:12 warns us:

“For we wrestle not against flesh and blood, but against principalities, against powers, against the rulers of the darkness of this world, against spiritual wickedness in high places.”

And 1 Peter 5:8 tells us:

“Be alert and of sober mind.Your enemy the devil prowls around like a roaring lion. looking for someone to devour”

From the moment your marriage ship was christened, Satan has been plotting to sink it.

He is crafty. He is relentless. He is on the prowl. But we needn’t succumb to his attacks.

We can win this war. But to make that happen, we need God’s grace, we need grit, and we need a good battle plan.

Our Battle PLAN for Marriage:

  • P = Pray

The best place to do battle for your marriage is on your knees. Couples who pray together regularly enjoy less than a 1% chance of divorce.

Marriage was God’s idea in the first place. It only makes sense to enlist His help in preserving yours. (1 Thessalonians 5:17, Ephesians 6:18, John 15:7)

  • L = Learn

Maintain a teachable spirit. Study what God’s Word says about marriage and about your responsibilities to your spouse.

Seek counsel from older, happily married couples who have remained committed to one another for several decades or more — what’s their secret?

Read good books about marriage, gleaning as much wisdom as you can and applying what you learn to your own life circumstances. (Proverbs 4:7, Psalm 25:4)

  • A = Anticipate

“Into each life some rain must fall.” Longfellow’s words are true of marriage, as well.

Expect an occasional gale. Prepare for it. And when storms blow in, don’t let them drive you apart. Hunker down and weather the tempest together, confident that the sun is still shining behind the clouds and the skies will eventually clear.

Anticipate also how your actions and reactions, both in good times and bad, will affect your spouse. Choices have consequences, so be careful that the decisions you make, the words that you say, and the things that you do are things that will build up and strengthen your marriage and your spouse rather than tearing them down. (Proverbs 14:1, 1 Thessalonians 5:11)

  • N = Nurture

Just as a gardener must spend time cultivating his beds — weeding, watering, fertilizing and pruning the plants to keep them healthy and fruitful — you must invest time and energy into your marriage if you want it to blossom and bear fruit.

Spend time with your spouse. Work together. Play together. Dream together. Pray together.

Be patient. Be considerate. Be respectful. Love your spouse with the kind of unselfish, sacrificial, committed love Christ has for the church. Do all these things, and your marriage will not only survive, but will thrive — even in the midst of attack. (Mark 10:6-9, Malachi 2:15-16)

So my husband and I are fighting again. We’ve been doing battle for our marriage for 27 years now.

We have no intention of throwing in the towel, because we believe marriage is worth fighting for — and we know God is on our side.

Have you joined in the fray? What has helped strengthen your marriage against the attack? Please share in the comments below. We’re always on the lookout for new and effective strategies.

Messy Beautiful Love {Review and Giveaway}

No marriage is ever beyond God's redeeming grace...Is your marriage struggling? Does it feel one-sided? Do you long for it to be more than it is?

Marriages are under attack as never before. Unfortunately, those attacks sometimes come not from without, but from within.

In Messy Beautiful Love, bestselling author Darlene Schacht discusses just such an attack on her own marriage — one that surely would have torn it apart were it not for God’s redeeming grace.

The biggest marital problems rarely begin big. Seldom are we slammed with something that materializes out of thin air. Our problems usually start out small and grow.

“If I were to pinpoint the one thing that led me to almost destroy my marriage,” Darlene writes candidly, “it would be that I was keeping a record of wrongs…. I took count of [all my husband’s] faults and kept track of each one.”

Do you ever do that? Do you harbor grudges against your husband or nurse resentment toward him in your heart? Be forewarned: doing so will lead you down a path you do not wish to follow.

“I had forgotten what 1 Corinthians says about love,” Darlene continues. “It is not rude, it is not self-seeking, it is not easily angered, it keeps no record of wrongs.”

"Love is what is left in a relationship when the selfishness is taken out." - Nick Richardson

Love is unselfish. It puts the other’s interests ahead of its own. While love heals wounds, unforgiveness causes them to fester. When we keep a record of wrongs, we do so to our own detriment. When we give root to bitterness, our love gets choked out and our hearts grow cold, hard, and impenetrable.

“The problem here isn’t your husband,” Darlene explains. “It’s that your level of expectation for him is outshining his character. When you measure him against the weight of expectation, you are left with an unbalanced scale.

“Accepting a person for who he or she is doesn’t mean that you excuse sin. I’d never ask or want you to do that. What I am asking you to do is to look past the human frailty of a man to seek his beauty by removing the weight of expectation you hold. I’m asking that you walk in the grace of messy, beautiful love.”

Darlene opens the book with a prayer that her testimony would bring glory and honor to God, and that it does. Hers is a powerful story of hope and redemption that will powerfully impact the life of everyone who reads it.

Messy Beautiful Love

Messy Beautiful Love is a collection of important life-lessons learned — some of them the hard way — that you can take and apply to your own marriage. When you do, you will avoid many of the pitfalls the author points out along the way.

Want to read this book yourself? Darlene’s publisher has graciously offered to give a free paperback copy to one of my readers. Enter to win it here: a Rafflecopter giveaway

10 Things Your Teenager Hates

10 Things Your Teenager Hates (Are you making any of these mistakes?) | http://lovinglifeathome.comThere’s no doubt about it.

Navigating life with a teenager at home can be a little tricky.

All those hormones raging through the bloodstream will sometimes have you walking on eggshells.

(Of course, teens might say the same thing about living with a menopausal mother, but that’s another post for another day.)

No parent is perfect. We all make mistakes. And it is sometimes necessary for us to make decisions that won’t necessarily be popular with our kids.

But if we can somehow manage to avoid the biggies — if we can refrain from doing these things our teens hate most — then our homes might be much happier, both during the teen years and beyond.

  1. Disapproval
  2. Your teenager hates to disappoint you. Whether he acts like it or not, he is hungry for your affirmation and approval. He needs to know that your love for him is unconditional. Yes, he’ll make mistakes. And yes, those mistakes may need to be addressed. But they’ll need to be addressed in a way that communicates your love for him and your confidence in his ability to do better.

  3. Lectures
  4. Your teenager hates being lectured. Sure, she still needs your counsel and correction from time to time, but it will fall on deaf ears if you deliver it in a spirit of anger or condescension. Don’t talk down to your teen or use sweeping generalizations. Make your point clearly, but don’t belabor it. Always and only speak the truth in love.

  5. Hypocrisy
  6. Do you use one voice for company and phone calls, but another for your family? Is the person you seem to be at work and church and out in the community the same person your spouse and children see at home every day? Teens are especially sensitive to discrepancies in this area. They are watching you, examining you, constantly observing whether your talk matches your walk. Be genuine and sincere. Live a life of integrity. Apologize and seek forgiveness from your family when you fail. Otherwise, you risk having your teen reject not only you, but everything you allegedly stand for.

  7. Micro-Management
  8. Don’t be a hovering, helicopter parent who tries to dictate your teen’s every move. The older she gets, the more important it is for her to take responsibility for making her own choices and decisions. This is a healthy part of growing up. Sometimes she may do things in a different way than you would do them, but in most cases, that is alright. God never intended for your teen to be an exact replica of you. She is wonderfully unique. Give her some freedom to be herself. When you try to control every detail of her life, it sends your teen the message that you think she’s either incompetent or untrustworthy.

  9. Passivity
  10. As much as your teen dislikes it when you’re controlling, the opposite extreme is just as bad. There must be a balance. Your teen still needs you to remain involved, to be available, to hold him accountable. When he pushes the limits, he’s just testing to make sure they’re still in place, the way you might push against the doors of your house each night to make sure they are properly latched. You should expand his boundaries a bit as he grows, but you shouldn’t remove them altogether. Whether consciously or not, your teen takes comfort in knowing that you care enough to keep tabs on him.

  11. Manipulation
  12. Your teen hates guilt trips. If you want or need her to do something for you, please just come out and say so. Don’t expect her to read your mind or try to guilt trip her into doing what you want. Be straightforward in your requests and sincerely grateful for her cooperation.

  13. Comparisons
  14. Your teen may tolerate positive comparisons to people he admires, but he hates to be compared negatively to anyone. Let him stand or fall on his own merit. There’s no reason to drag anybody else into it. If a comparison must be made, let it be in comparing your teen to his younger self and noting the growth, maturity, and progress he’s made.

  15. Discord
  16. This may seem counterintuitive, given how prone she is to argue sometimes, but your teenager hates strife. She especially hates to hear her parents fighting. There is enough turmoil in the world — don’t add to it by being at odds with your spouse. Let your home be a haven of rest, a peaceful oasis where your children can relax, recharge, and take refuge from worldly cares in full confidence of your commitment not only to them, but to one another, as well.

  17. Inflexibility
  18. Avoid letting “no” become your knee-jerk response. Don’t get locked into doing things a certain way, just because that’s how you’ve always done them. Be willing to think outside the box and weigh all the options, especially when making decisions that affect your teen. Attempt to see things from his perspective. Sympathize. Remember what it was like to be a teen yourself. And if your erstwhile dreams, ideals, and love for adventure have been snuffed out in the passing years, do your best to rekindle them — for your own sake as much as for his.

  19. Uncertainty
  20. Remember the verse about not being anxious for tomorrow, because each day has enough troubles of its own? This is especially true for our teenagers. Our kids face so many uncertainties during these years — Will I pass my test? Will I make the team? Will I get into college? Will I ever find love? — they don’t need parents heaping their own worries on top of what’s already there. Remain calm. Don’t overreact. Pray for your teen, point him to the solid Rock, anchor him there when the storms roll in, and assure him the sun will soon come out again.

What other things does your teen hate? Is there anything else you’d add to this list? Let me know in the comments below.


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The Bundle Books I’m Reading First

Wonderful resources for healthy livingAnybody who has followed this blog for long knows that I love to read. I average about a book a week.

Although I like a variety of genres, I especially enjoy books that teach me something new. The more I read, the more I learn. And the more I learn, the more I want to learn.

That’s one reason I’m so excited about the titles included in this year’s Ultimate Healthy Living Bundle.

I used to think e-book bundles weren’t for me. I really prefer reading hard copies of books rather than digital, so I’d skip over bundle ads without much thought.

But then I noticed that last spring’s Ultimate Homemaking Bundle included four books I was already intending to read — and some quick calculations showed me that those four books, bought individually, were going to cost me more than the entire bundle put together.

So I took a chance and bought the whole thing.

And am I ever glad I did.

The quality of books included with the Ultimate Bundles far surpassed my expectations, and all the free bonus products made the deal even sweeter. (I am still using the Dizolve laundry detergent that was included with the Ultimate Homemaking Bundle — I liked the full-sized sample box so much, I bought two more when I finished the first.)

So is the current Ultimate Healthy Living Bundle for you? I’d encourage you to take a closer look to find out, especially if you are interested in making better health and lifestyle decisions, getting fit, losing weight, boosting energy, using greener products, creating nutritious and delicious meals for your family, and/or doing what you can to prevent serious diseases.

If some of the topics appeal to you, but others don’t, that’s okay. Nobody expects you to read them all. Feel free to pick and choose.

Personally, I’m planning to skip reading the books about cloth diapering and natural childbirth, because — as sad as it makes me to admit it — baby season seems to be behind me now. And since I’m not allergic to gluten, eggs, or dairy, I probably won’t take time to read the bundle books on those topics, either.

But there are several books in this bundle that are very applicable to where I am at this point in in my life.

These are the ones I’m focusing on first:


  • The Eczema Cure
  • The Eczema CureI had eczema as a child. Although I eventually outgrew it, I well remember the way it burned and itched and kept me awake at night. Although I haven’t personally been troubled by the condition for years, I have a little son who suffers terribly with it. He has cracked, crusty skin around both ankles that sometimes even breaks open and bleeds. It looks far worse than anything I ever had when I was little.

    We’ve tried lotions and cortisone creams galore, and although they’ve helped to some degree, nothing has been able to clear it up completely. That’s why I was so glad to get my hands on a copy of The Eczema Cure. The author gives detailed, step-by-step advice for treating eczema from the inside out.

    (Note: Just this title alone retails for $30. That’s like getting the rest of the bundle for free!)


  • Money Saving Mom’s Guide to Freezer Cooking
  • Freezer CookingI love every book I’ve ever read by Money-Saving Mom Crystal Paine (which is quite a few now) so when I noticed she had a book in this bundle, I downloaded that one first. Tried, true, and to-the-point, Crystal shares strategies for freezer cooking that will fit any mom’s schedule — whether you have a whole day to devote to preparing your family’s meals in advance, or just fifteen minutes at a time here and there.

    I did a little freezer cooking after buying the Ultimate Homemaking Bundle last spring, but grew discouraged when our freezer broke down (twice!) this summer, and all my hard work was lost. :-( The frig has been fixed now and has given us no further problems, so I ‘m ready to try again. Crystal’s book was just the motivation I needed.


  • Clean & Simple
  • Clean & Simple Stephanie Langford’s subtitle tells you exactly what you can expect out of this one: “7 Inexpensive Ingredients, 12 Green Cleaning Recipes That Work.”

    When I recently ran out of furniture polish, I searched this little volume for alternatives to what I’d been using. Although dusting spray was not one of the twelve recipes mentioned in the title, Stephanie did include a link in the back to exactly what I was looking for, and it works beautifully. What’s more, she provides in the dozen some simple, easy recipes for other things I use regularly but hadn’t thought of making myself, like foaming hand-soap and oven cleaner.

    Not only are the homemade varieties of each of these better for my family and better for the environment, but they can be made for a fraction of what their store-bought counterparts cost. And they work! It’s a win-win!


  • 42 Simple & Healthy Dinners
  • 42 Simple and Healthy DinnersWhen I learned that one of the authors of this book, Brandy Ferguson, is the mother of eight boys, I knew I had to read it. If she has discovered how to cook healthful, whole food meals that simultaneously satisfy a house full of growing boys, then I want in on her secrets! The book is filled luscious looking photographs for protein-rich dishes such as garlic lemon chicken and pasta, basil beef lettuce wraps, and tilapia tacos, plus a whole section of vegetarian recipes.

    This collection of recipes is meant to complement Brandy’s other book, 42 Days to Fit which contains, among other things, a custom-written exercise plan I’m eager to try designed specifically for mothers. Since that book’s also included in the Healthy Living Bundle, I’m planning to read both concurrently.


  • The Happy Housewife’s Guide to Dealing with Picky Eaters
  • Dealing with Picky EatersI haven’t started this one yet, but intend to do so right away, as I’m dealing with a couple of picky eaters at my house right now and getting a little frustrated.

    They aren’t picky in the usual sense of only wanting to eat junk food. Both are huge salad and veggie eaters, but they turn up their noses at anything with even a hint of meat in it. This their father, who is a diehard meat and potatoes man, can scarcely comprehend.

    Don’t get me wrong — I’m thrilled that my little ones love lettuce and spinach. I’m just hoping the Toni Anderson’s tips will give me fresh ideas for encouraging them to try some new dishes, as well.


  • Simply Salads by Season
  • Simply SaladsAnd if I can’t talk my little ones into eating anything but salad? Then at least Kristen Michaelis’ book Simply Salads by Season (also included in the bundle) will help me add some variety that way.

    Kristen offers a treasure trove of salad recipes, all filed and organized according to when the main components are most readily available: spring, summer, winter, fall, or year round.

    She also includes more than two dozen recipes for salad dressings and condiments using all-natural, whole foods ingredients, making this book a great resource you’ll want to refer back to again and again.


  • The Urban Chicken
  • The Urban ChickenGiven that I live in town in close proximity to my neighbors, the choice of this book may seem a little odd, but I’ve always been enamored with the idea of raising chickens and would like to learn more about how one goes about it.

    This summer, my children and I got to talk to some folks who raise quail, and they assured us those birds would be quiet enough to keep in our backyard without any fear of disturbing our neighbors. I’m thinking that much of the material in Heather Harris’s book, The Urban Chicken, would probably apply to raising quail, so I am planning to give it a look-see as I continue to contemplate the possibility of harvesting fresh eggs every morning from my own back porch.


  • The Nourished Metabolism
  • The Nourished MetabolismI have always had a low metabolism, but now that I am closing in on fifty, my metabolism seems to have sunk through the floor. There was a time (back in my twenties) when three months of breastfeeding was all it took to completely melt my baby fat away. I delivered my last baby the day before I turned forty-five, and — four years later — have still not dropped all the weight I gained during that pregnancy, despite daily workouts and meticulous calorie counting for months at a time.

    I’m hoping that Elizabeth Walling’s book, The Nourished Metabolism, will give me some good guidance as to what I might do to naturally combat this problem. And here again, this one book retails for $30, more than the price of the whole bundle.


  • Get Up & Go: Fun Ideas for Getting Fit as a Family
  • Get Up & Go  - Front CoverI don’t think I’ve mentioned it on this blog yet, but a few months ago, I finished writing my new book, Get Up & Go.

    And guess what?

    It’s included in this bundle, too!

    So if I were to list the bundle books in the order I’ve read them, this one should really come first, as I had to go through it cover to cover at least three or four times during the editing process.

    This book is full of great ideas for staying active as a family. Don’t be duped into thinking you need a gym membership and a babysitter to work in a good work out — it’s much more fun to get in shape alongside your husband and children, and you’ll make some wonderful memories in the process!

So… that’s my list of personal picks for this particular bundle. If you’d like to read them ,too, you’ll need to act fast: This bundle will only be available until Monday, September 15, or until 30K copies are sold. If you wait too long, you’ll miss it!


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